Notice to all town residents

Citizens are reminded that signs are not allowed in the Town of Eau Galle right of way, normally 33ft from the centerline of the road. This includes real estate signs, advertisements and any other signs. All signs that are in the Town right of way will be removed by the Town and the owner of the sign will be charged for the expense involved.

-- Eau Galle Town Board

Comprehensive Land Use Plan

** UNOFFICIAL **

 A COMPREHENSIVE LAND USE PLAN FOR THE TOWN OF EAU GALLE

Planning Commission Members:

  • Bill Peavey, Chairman
  • Dennis Duckworth, Vice-Chariman
  • Connie North, Secretary
  • Jerry Campbell
  • Bill Hanson
  • Dennis Hillstead
  • Mike Ostlie

Thank you to Tim Ramberg for his assistance with the Transportation Element, and to all the Town of Eau Galle residents for their participation in the planning process.

November 2002

Table of Contents

  • Introduction
  • Issues and Opportunities Element
  • Housing Element
  • Transportation Element
  • Utilities Element
  • Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Resources Element
  • Intergovernmental Cooperation Element
  • Description of Land Use Districts
  • Guidelines for Clustered Housing & Open Space Preservation
  • Plan Implementation
  • Summary

Images

  • Town of Eau Galle Classification Map
  • Town of Eau Galle Zoning Map
  • Town of Eau Galle 2000 Census General Demographics

A LONG-RANGE LAND USE PLAN FOR THE TOWN OF EAU GALLE

Introduction

SECTION 62.23 of Wisconsin Statutes is the legislation upon which all towns, villages and cities in Wisconsin that decide to plan for the physical development of the community must base such planning and plan implementation.  In fact, the Wisconsin planning statute mandates that any town, village or city which creates a plan commission and any town which adopts village powers pursuant to Sec. 61.35, shall prepare a master plan for community development.  Through the years of planning practice in the United States, the term “comprehensive plan” has been legally and verbally substituted as a more descriptive term for “master plan”.

The elements of a comprehensive plan are set forth in Sec. 66.0295(4) and encompass both major and minor categories of use of land and the supporting utilities and facilities of that use. The Comprehensive Plan definition breaks down the planning process into nine elements:

  1. Issues and Opportunities Element
  2. Housing Element
  3. Transportation Element
  4. Utilities and Community Facilities Element
  5. Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Element
  6. Economic Development Element
  7. Intergovernmental Cooperation Element
  8. Land Use Element
  9. Implementation Element

The most basic and perhaps most important element of the comprehensive plan is the Land Use Plan because it forms the foundation for all the other comprehensive plan elements such as transportation, park and open space, sanitary sewerage and water supply, and storm water drainage system.  Major plan implementation documents such as zoning and land division ordinances and detail plans for neighborhood development are also elements of a comprehensive plan.

Issues and Opportunities Element

The Town of Eau Galle is a community located on the outer edge of a large, developing and expanding metropolitan area.  The community is bounded by three villages and is located along I-94 (the Interstate Highway). Due to both the physical location and the attribute of visually attractive, developable land, it was anticipated that certainly the first years of the 21st century will bring pressures to change the natural, rural landscape to more urban uses.

The Setting

The planning area encompasses all those lands within the approximately 36 square mile survey township.  The community lies in the eastern one-half of St. Croix County, which abuts the State of Minnesota, the boundary of which with the State of Wisconsin is formed by the St. Croix River.  The community is located approximately fifteen (15) miles east of the City of Hudson, Wisconsin and 24 miles east of the “twin cities” of Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota.  I-94 traverses the northern-quarter of the community in an east-west direction with an interchange with State Highway 63, which borders the western community in a north-south direction.  County Highway B traverses the community in a north-south direction with an interchange with I-94.  County Road N traverses the community in an east-west direction.

The community lies within the commuter shed of the Twin Cities, and a commuter park and ride lot is located near the I-94 and State Highway 63 interchange and is well utilized. The Eau Galle River is the only significant tributary in the community and traverses the extreme eastern one-quarter corner of the community, although the Rush River flows seasonally through the northwestern one-quarter of the community.

Land Features and Public Facilities

The approximately 36 square mile area of the community has predominately rolling and wooded features.  The southeastern one-quarter of the community has natural features of tall, limestone bluffs.  The community has scattered areas of wetlands.

Existing Land Use and Socio-Economic Features

The residential use in the community is dispersed and is virtually almost all single family units. Residential use in the community is located on relatively large lots.  In addition, there is one small subdivision in the community. The Town of Eau Galle Planning Commission has used trends from the past five (5) years in its forecast of population, household and employment rate of growth:  a 5% per year growth in housing over twenty (20) years will result in the approximate doubling of population and housing units after 20 years.

See attached Tables DP-1 through DP-4 for demographic trends, age distribution, educational levels, income levels and employment characteristics that exist within the local governmental unit.  (Source:  U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000).

Commercial Use

The principal area of commercial use in the community is located at the I-94 and State Highway 63 interchange.  Other commercial uses are scattered throughout the community.

Industrial Use

Industrial use in the community is limited to a county-owned lime rock quarry and a few privately owned gravel pits.

Governmental and Institutional Uses

A 37.5 acre tract of land in the center of the community is the Town Hall site.

Housing Element

Housing units in the Town of Eau Galle consist mostly of single family units in a rural setting, with a good mix of older single family farm houses and newer homes. The Town had a 22.1% increase in housing units from 1990 to 2000. The average size of the household per unit has increased slightly over the past ten years, from 2.8 to 2.9 per household. The median value owner-occupied unit has increased from $44,300 in 1990 to approximately $118,300 in 2000. (See attached Tables DP-1 through DP-4. Source:  U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000).

At the present time, there are very few rental units available in the Town of Eau Galle. Significant growth in rental housing is not anticipated in the Town, as it is readily available in the Villages of Baldwin and Woodville. Multi-family or rental units would be more suited for development adjacent to those in place (see map) or along the main traffic corridors of U.S. 63 and County Roads N and B. The Town of Eau Galle has a single-family dwelling ordinance.

Assistance may be available for affordable and special-needs housing through the Federal government’s Rural Development Program. In the event of low-income government housing, it is expected that these sites would be adjacent to or within the Villages to take advantage of services and employment opportunities there. At the present, there are no local government programs to promote development of the housing supply, and the need for them is not anticipated.

The main objective of new development should be to maintain the character of the area as a rural setting. Setback policies are proposed to allow for the remodeling and renovation of the existing housing stock that is not presently allowed in the St. Croix County ordinance.

Transportation Element

 Objectives and Goals:  The Town of Eau Galle’s Transportation Element to the Comprehensive Land Use Plan is intended to guide effective, efficient, and economical planning, construction and maintenance of all Town roads and transportation systems or facilities within the Town. The overall goal is to promote public safety, welfare and accessibility to the users, and protect property values along with preservation of the overall tax base. This can be accomplished through coordination and cooperation not only within the Town but also with surrounding municipalities, the county and the state.

Policies: Local authority and control allow issues to be addressed with logic, common sense and the “intent” of each policy in mind. The Town of Eau Galle’s road system is within St. Croix County. Very few local roads are continuous connections though the Township. The transportation issues that need to be addressed in the Township are, and will be, different than the rest of the county. Local road classification authority with assistance from the state and/or county, if requested, considers the unique criteria in the Town which will result in effective outcome consistent with statewide classification. Refer to the Town of Eau Galle ordinance for specific policy restrictions regarding driveway separation, setbacks, mailbox placement, temporary sign placement, debris and other roadway obstructions. The state and/or township minimum standards for local roads will be used.

Maps:  A road map is included that identifies the current classification of each road. The ordinance includes a chart of setback guidelines, a drawing of vision triangles, and a chart of driveway separation guidelines.

Programs:  Incorporating the state and county transportation plans and transportation corridor plans, as well as county highway functional jurisdictional studies and county bike/pedestrian plan, this Plan expands the criteria to include tree local road classifications by function (major local roads, minor local roads, and single purpose local roads).

1.  Principal arterials:  Highways that serve corridor movements having trip length and travel density characteristics of an interstate or inter regional nature. WisDOT has classified I-94 through Eau Galle Township as a principal arterial interstate highway; and USH 63 along Eau Galle’s west side as a principal arterial “other” highway. It can be expected that WisDOT will expand USH 63 to four (4) lanes as use and need dictate.

2.  Minor arterials:  Highways that are in conjunction with principal arterials serve cities, large communities and other traffic generators providing intra-regional and inter-area traffic movements. WisDOT has no minor arterial highways classified in Eau Galle Township.

3.   Major collectors:  Highways that provide service to moderate sized communities and other intra-area traffic generators, and link those generators to nearby larger population centers or higher function routes. St. Croix County Highway Department and WisDOT classify CTH “B” through Eau Galle as a major collector.

4.  Minor collectors:  Highways that provide service to all remaining smaller communities, link the locally important traffic generators with their rural hinterland, and are spaced consistent with population density so as to collect traffic from local roads and bring all developed areas within a reasonable distance of a collector road. St. Croix Highway Department and WisDOT classify CTH “N” through Eau Galle as a minor collector.

5.  Major local roads:  Local roads that provide access to adjacent land and provide for travel over relatively short distances on an inter-township or intra-township basis. St. Croix County Highway Department and WisDOT classify CTH “BB” (currently) as a major local road through Eau Galle. The Town of Eau Galle currently classifies one road as a major local road:  the east/west route of 55th Avenue down 233rd Street and along 50th Avenue parallel to I-94. Other roads could be considered as major local roads in the future pending growth and developments in the nearby villages.

6.  Minor local roads:  Local roads that give access to adjacent land providing for local travel over short distances on an inter-township basis or intra-township basis, linking local traffic to major local roads, collectors or arterials. These roads carry low traffic volumes compared to major local roads. Most of Eau Galle’s roads currently fall under this classification.

7.   Single purpose roads:  Local roads used for a single purpose such as driveways that service one to three families. These roads are dead-end in nature and are very specific in their purpose. Several “driveways” that Eau Galle maintains fall under this classification.

Transit – There are no mass transit issues in Eau Galle Township at this time. There exists a “Park and Ride” lot that may assist in transit, but mass transit will not be a part of this Plan until the need arises by the community or local officials.

Disabled transportation – There are no disabled transportation issues addressed by Eau Galle Township at this time. Most disabled transportation needs are in cities and villages and many are taken care of by charitable organizations. Disabled transportation will not be a part of this Plan until the need arises by the community or local officials.

Bicycle and walking facilities – A bicycle and pedestrian path (Wildwood Trail) exists on the old railroad bed that extends from the Village of Woodville south (along either side of 250th Street) to Pierce County. St. Croix County has the responsibility of this path. Roadside bike and pedestrian path routes are included in the St. Croix County Highway Department Bicycle/Pedestrian Transportation Plan. This Plan serves as a tool for reference when improving roadways. If the designated bike/pedestrian routes are being considered for improvement, the Town will review the improvements desired for bike and pedestrian transportation. Funding is a separate issue to be considered along with the improvement decisions. The safety of residents and the traveling public are of utmost importance during the development and maintenance of these transportation facilities. The Bicycle/Pedestrian Transportation Plan recommends three facility types (shared roadway, paved shoulder and path or trail). CTH “N” and the Wildwood Trail are the only designated Bicycle/Pedestrian routes listed on the plan that run through Eau Galle, and no bicycle/pedestrian traffic is allowed on I-94.

1.   Shared roadway:  Roads with relatively low traffic volumes and able to meet the suitability standards, and can be safely shared by bicyclists, pedestrians and motorists with no additional improvements necessary. All other Eau Galle roadways not listed on the county designated bike/pedestrian plan currently handle the local bicycle and pedestrian traffic as designed. Bikes and pedestrians use the gravel shoulders when necessary and share the roadway with vehicle traffic in a safe and efficient manner through the current traffic laws.

2.   Paved shoulder:  Rural collector highways that are not suitable as  shared roadways should have paved shoulders to a minimum width of three feet to accommodate bicycle/pedestrian traffic. There are no  designated roads in Eau Galle of this type.

3.   Path/Trail:  A bike/pedestrian path/trail should be physically separated from motor vehicle traffic by an open space or barrier and may be within the road right-of-way or within an open space. They should be constructed with an 8-10 foot wide paved surface and a two-foot clear zone on each side to accommodate two-way travel. Structures such as bridges, overpasses and underpasses should be constructed 10-12 feet width where feasible. St. Croix County is currently improving this facility (Wildwood Trail).

Railroads – No railroads exist in Eau Galle at this time. The only foreseeable railroad would be through a federally developed mass transit rail system in the I-94 median or along I-94. Until then, railroads will not be a part of this Plan.

Air transportation – No airports currently exist in Eau Galle at this time. Several nearby cities and villages in the surrounding communities have airports so we see no need for air transportation facilities at this time. The only foreseeable air transportation issues would be generated by the desires of private landowners that hold pilot licenses and desire to house their personal airplane helicopter or air-vehicle on their land. This may generate a considerable amount of controversy from the community and research into the effects and effects of an air facility should be done before any air facility decisions are made.

Trucking transportation – There is currently a trucking firm in Eau Galle along USH 63/I-94 on 47th Avenue. An objective of this Plan is to direct the development of industries along the I-94 and USH 63 corridors. These are federal roadways that have been built, with proper surface, base, setbacks, road width, etc., to handle the traffic generated by these types of businesses. Truck traffic generally follows along the higher level roadways (arterials and collectors) which are federal, state or county jurisdictional highways. One of the goals of this Plan is to keep this truck traffic on the arterial and collector highways.

Water transportation – The only bodies of water in Eau Galle are streams and very small rivers, most of which run dry every year. There are no water transportation systems in Eau Galle and none will be address in this Plan.

Conclusion:  Comprehensive regulatory devises could have a significant bearing on the implementation of this Township Plan, such as setbacks and other regulations pertaining to federal, state and county owned highways yet comprehensive regulatory authority does not necessarily ensure Plan success.

The employment pf “non-regulatory” planning devices should also be part of a continuing program for plan implementation and refinement.  Therefore, references are to be made to other plans currently in existence and duplication, such as specific highway system plans details, is only for clarification, along with cooperation with other plans to encourage and enhance the opportunity for success of the town’s plan.

Some ordinance Recommendations:

  • The highways in Eau Galle are to be kept clear of obstruction for safe travel and maintenance.
  • Mailboxes are to be at least two feet off the shoulder for maintenance activities.
  • Miscellaneous temporary signs are not to obstruct vision of the traveling public.
  • Rocks, Branches, and other yard debris are to be kept out of ditches and roadways for efficient drainage, vision, and vehicle travel.
  • Highway setbacks match the class of roadway outlined in the plan. The footage should be the shorter of the two figures noted in the following guideline:
Highway SetbacksPrincipal ArterialMinor ArterialMajor CollectorMinor CollectorMajor Local RoadMinor Local RoadSingle Purpose Road
From Centerline190 feet150 feet133 feet133 feet133 feet100 feet83 feet
From Right-of-way50 feet100 feet100 feet100 feet100 feet67 feet50 feet

Utilities Element

Two telephone companies serve the Town of Eau Galle along with two electric companies with an electric sub-station and high voltage lines. The Town of Eau Galle also has three major fiber optic cables running across it, along with a major high-pressure pipeline.

There is no sanitary sewer or potable water service in the Town. Contracts between the Town Board and the two adjacent Villages have demonstrated no inclination from them to allow creation of a sanitary sewer district.

Baldwin Telecom, Inc., based in Baldwin, WI., is the major supplier of telephone service in the Town of Eau Galle. Baldwin Telecom, Inc. has indicated they have adequate trunk lines to serve any anticipated growth in the Town and could serve most development with increased branch lines. They do not anticipate any major improvements in the Town except for the upgrade of some lines to fiber optic lines.

West Wisconsin Telecom, Inc., through their Spring Lake and Spring Valley exchanges, serves a small portion of the Town in the southern east corner and is based in Downsville, WI. West Wisconsin Telecom, Inc. indicates they have adequate facilities to serve any anticipated growth in the Town and does not anticipate any improvements in the near future except for upgrading present lines.

St. Croix Electric Cooperative is the major supplier of electric service in the Town of Eau Galle and is based in Hammond, WI. A map of their area is included at the end of this chapter. St. Croix Electric Cooperative has indicated that the Woodville Substation located on County BB gives them adequate power supply to serve any increase in residential load. Any new residential growth could easily be served by the construction of small single-phase feeder lines. No major line construction of new lines is anticipated in the near future but replacement of lines installed in the early 1940’s will continue.

Northern States Power is the other supplier of electric service to the Town of Eau Galle and the Town is served from their Eau Claire office. NSP has indicated that any residential growth in the Town of Eau Galle could be served by their present facilities. NSP does not anticipate any major construction in the near future in the Town. NSP does have a 69KVA-transmission line running north to south through the Town of Eau Galle.

Dairyland Power, based in LaCrosse, WI., has a substation on County BB that serves all the St. Croix Electric Cooperative members in the Town of Eau Galle. Dairyland Power also has a 35KVA-transmission line serving the “Woodville” substation and another 35KVA-transmission line running north to south serving the “Baldwin” substation. Dairyland Power indicated that present facilities are adequate to serve any anticipated residential growth in the Town of Eau Galle. Dairyland Power has no upgrades or improvements planned but growth in other areas they serve could require improvements in transmission lines.

Williams Pipeline has a major high-pressure gas line along the middle of the southern six (6) Sections in Eau Galle Township.

Qwest Communications has a major fiber optics line along the I-94 corridor in the Township.

Wisconsin Gas Company

 Revised 9-19-02

 Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Resources Element

 Objectives:  To protect, preserve and promote the conservation and management of the Town’s natural resources such as ground water, forest, productive agricultural areas, environmentally sensitive areas, threatened and endangered species, streams, surface waters, flood plains, wetlands, wildlife habitat, metallic and non-metallic minerals, parks, open spaces, historical and cultural resources, community design, and recreational resources

Policies Federal, State, and local policies are in effect to protect and preserve various areas of our natural resources. Areas covered under these policies must be enforced to protect our ground waters, streams, surface waters, flood plains, wetlands, environmentally sensitive areas, and our threatened and endangered species.

Goals The Town of Eau Galle should maintain a policy to protect and preserve agricultural, natural, and cultural resources by monitoring its growth and land usages. This would be accomplished by reviewing building permits and requests for changes in zoning. Without our natural resources, our land would be uninhabitable to humans and wildlife. This would not be monitored to stop the current rate of changes our Town has experienced, but to maintain a smart growth ratio. The trend has shown that small farms are on a decline, while large farms are increasing to replace the loss of dairy and food products produced by smaller farms. Farms should be allowed to produce and market their products under the Right to Farm Act.  The changes we have experienced in the Town have also shown an increase of housing due to the high demand for rural living. It is also important to maintain our rural area by saving open spaces. Monitoring the lot sizes allowed for each residence is one way to accomplish this. This would also create a specific community design that should encompass most of our Township. The Town should provide for the co-existance of agricultural and residential. Historical and cultural resources must also be protected. This would help aid in the smart growth concept. Agricultural, forestry, open spaces, and wildlife are four items in which the Town is rich and abundant. We should always take steps to preserve these major resources.

Maps There are numerous maps available for items covered in this section. Most of these maps are available through government agencies. Maps that have been reviewed by the Comprehensive Plan Commission are:  soil survey maps, flood plain maps, wetland map, threatened and endangered species maps, geological survey (topographic) map, and water table map.

Programs There are abundant programs available for various agricultural and natural resources. St. Croix County Agricultural Agencies have many different programs available through a number of agencies. They are available to the public and aid farmers to help preserve our agricultural resources. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has a number of programs available to aid the public to help preserve and protect our forests and wildlife habitats.

Economic Development Element

The Comprehensive Land Use Plan will allow non-industrial commercial and service industries in the Town in designated districts.  We are encouraging the current economic agricultural use by the logical location of other economic activities based on their proximity to transportation corridors and utilities services. The Comprehensive Land Use Plan also encourages agricultural activity through the Exclusive Agriculture District.

  1. Refer to attached Table DP-1 through DP-4. (Source:  U.S. Census Bureau, Census 2000.
  2. The Comprehensive Land Use Plan encourages service and light commercial growth but does not encourage industrial growth due to lack of sufficient infrastructure to support it.
  3. The Town of Eau Galle is not part of the St. Croix County Economic Development Corporation and the current state annexation laws are unfavorable to local town’s economic development.
  4. Refer to map for designated sites.
  5. The Town of Eau Galle has one EPA contaminated site that is contained and closed. Due to the nature of the containment, that land is unsuitable for development. There may be unused manure lagoons in the Town that can be reclaimed and used as productive agricultural land.
  6. There are a number of State and Federal Agencies that were established to help with low interest loans, financing and counseling for small businesses.  Some of these agencies are:
    • the Small Business Administration which is administered by the Federal Government;
    • the Wisconsin Housing and Economic Development Program for small business loans, administered by the State of Wisconsin;
    • the Community Development Block Grant Program, a Federally-funded program administered by       the Wisconsin Department of Commerce;
    • the UW Extension which offers Small Business Development Counseling that is a free private individualized program for small businesses, new and existing.
    • There are many other programs too numerous to list.

Revised 10-17-02

Revised 8-15-02

 Intergovernmental Cooperation Element

At this time, the Town of Eau Galle has cooperation with local libraries, summer recreation programs, and the hockey association. There is a county bicycle and snowmobile trail through the Town which was constructed by the St. Croix County Parks Department with assistance by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers.

Other intergovernmental cooperation include the ambulance and fire and rescue services with three local villages and the St. Croix County Sheriff’s Department.  State, county and local villages are served by two cell phone towers located in the Town.  Consideration is being given to share in the cost of writing and administering the ordinance for the Comprehensive Land Use Plan with other governmental units. A copy of the most recent Capital Improvement Plan for the Village of Baldwin and the Village of Woodville is on file with the Planning Commission.

The Town of Eau Galle cooperates with the St. Croix Highway Department by hiring the Department to maintain the Town roads year around.

A concern, at present, is with the local villages with regard to compensation  for annexation of property.  This could be resolved through a change in  state statute.  Also, there is a conflict with the St. Croix County Zoning Department with regard to the processing of rezonement requests and timely issuance of county sanitary permits.

Revised 8-15-02

Description of Land Use Districts

The Land Use Districts proposed by the Planning Commission are based on input from residents, survey of residents and input from Commission members. The Commission tried to balance the desire of many residents to keep Eau Galle “rural” with the property rights of the larger land tract owners who consider the tracts of land their retirement plan. 65% of the residents completed and returned their survey. Of that 65%, 77% preferred a density of 8 or fewer houses per 40 acres; 15% preferred a density of 20 or more houses per 40 acres. According to acreage, 70% preferred a density of 8 or fewer houses per 40 acres, and 25% preferred 20 or more houses per 40 acres  (See attached graphs).

Commercial:

This Land Use District is composed of the area around the interchanges with I-94.  The following business would be allowed:   (See attached list of specific businesses).

Residential: 

In this Land Use District, more compact residential development will be allowed. This District will act as a buffer between the Commercial area and the more rural Ag./Residential areas. Residential density of twenty (20) single-family dwelling units per 40 acres with no minimum lot size. A multi-family dwelling (a duplex) could be allowed on state and county highways and on Township major local roads only. A multi-family dwelling (consisting of more than two units), with central sewer, could be allowed on state and county highways only.

Agriculture Residential:

In this Land Use District, development will be less dense and more rural. This District will comprise most of the Township, encompassing the present Exclusive Ag. District along with most of the present Ag./Residential District. Residential density of eight (8) single-family dwelling units per 40 acres with a minimum lot size of 2 acres. This density will apply throughout adjacent acres of a single owner. Adjacent acres is defined as “land adjacent to or connected to one another. A road, right-of-way or easement does not sever the connection”. (See chart for permissible densities and set-aside green space requirements).

Exclusive Agriculture:

This Land Use District will be comprised of those parcels of 35 or more acres that the owner has indicated would prefer these acres stay agricultural forever. Two (2) single-family dwelling units per farmstead would be allowed (farmstead being defined as “the land owned on the date of the adoption of the Plan”). This District would comply with the requirements of Wisconsin Statutes on the Farmland Preservation Act.

Conservation:

This Land Use District is designed to preserve open space and conserve natural resources, and would be prohibited from any development in the future. Residential density of 0 units per parcel would be allowed. This would be enforced by Deed Restriction.

 Revised 10-17-02

 Guidelines for Clustered Housing & Open Space Preservation

This is based on the number of adjoining acres owned by one landowner in the ag-res district on date of adoption of Town Land Use Plan.  Adjoining acres is defined as parcels adjacent to or connected to one another, a road, right of way or easement do not sever the connection.

Number of adjacent acres owned
Single Family Dwelling Units Allowed that could be grouped
Minimum Acres for Dwelling Units
Acres of Green space required
1
0
0
1
2
1
2
0
3
1
2
1
4
1
2
2
5
1
2
3
6
1
2
4
7
1
2
5
8
1
2
6
9
1
2
7
10
2
4
6
11
2
4
7
12
2
4
8
13
2
4
9
14
2
4
10
15
3
6
9
16
3
6
10
17
3
6
11
18
3
6
12
19
3
6
13
20
4
8
12
21
4
8
13
22
4
8
14
23
4
8
15
24
4
8
16
25
5
10
15
26
5
10
16
27
5
10
17
28
5
10
18
29
5
10
19
30
6
12
18
31
6
12
19
32
6
12
20
33
6
12
21
34
6
12
22
35
7
14
21
36
7
14
22
37
7
14
23
38
7
14
24
39
7
14
25
40
8
16
24
41
8
16
25
42
8
16
26
43
8
16
27
44
8
16
28
45
9
18
27
46
9
18
28
47
9
18
29
48
9
18
30
49
9
18
31
50
10
20
30
51
10
20
31
52
10
20
32
53
10
20
33
54
10
20
34
55
11
22
33
56
11
22
34
57
11
22
35
58
11
22
36
59
11
22
37
60
12
24
36
61
12
24
37
62
12
24
38
63
12
24
39
64
12
24
40
65
13
26
39
66
13
26
40
67
13
26
41
68
13
26
42
69
13
26
43
70
14
28
42
71
14
28
43
72
14
28
44
73
14
28
45
74
14
28
46
75
15
30
45
76
15
30
46
77
15
30
47
78
15
30
48
79
15
30
49
80
16
32
48
81
16
32
49
82
16
32
50
83
16
32
51
84
16
32
52
85
17
34
51
86
17
34
52
87
17
34
53
88
17
34
54
89
17
34
55
90
18
36
54
91
18
36
55
92
18
36
56
93
18
36
57
94
18
36
58
95
19
38
57
96
19
38
58
97
19
38
59
98
19
38
60
99
19
38
61
100
20
40
60
101
20
40
61
102
20
40
62
103
20
40
63
104
20
40
64
105
21
42
63
106
21
42
64
107
21
42
65
108
21
42
66
109
21
42
67
110
22
44
66
111
22
44
67
112
22
44
68
113
22
44
69
114
22
44
70
115
23
46
69
116
23
46
70
117
23
46
71
118
23
46
72
119
23
46
73
120
24
48
72
121
24
48
73
Above 120 acres the number of DU that could be "grouped" stays constant at 24, number of dwelling units grows at the rate of 1 per 5 acres owned grows at the rate of 1 DU per 5 acres.

April 14, 2001

Of residents that responded…

    77% favor exclusive agriculture, primary agriculture, general rural, or rural residential 8. A density of 1 house per 40 up to 8 houses per 40.

     15% favor rural residential 20 or rural flexible  A density of 20 houses per 40 up to 40 houses per 40.

Of acreage…

–    70% favor exclusive agriculture, primary agriculture, general rural, or rural residential 8

     25%  favor rural residential 20 or rural flexible

*      *      *      *      *      

Of total residents…

     48% favor exclusive agriculture, primary agriculture, general rural, or rural residential 8

     9% favor rural residential 20 or rural flexible

Of total acreage…

   52% favor exclusive agriculture, primary agriculture, general rural, or rural residential 8

–    19% favor rural residential 20 or rural flexible

 

Commercial Land Use District
(Discussed 10-18-01)

Conditional Use

Adult Entertainment

Automotive Dealership

Automotive Associated Repair & Service

Bar/Tavern (Liquor On/Off)

Bowling Alley, Dance Hall, Video Arcade or Skating Rink

Clothing, Apparel or Footwear Retail

Computer, Television/Video, Audio, Furniture, Office Equipment or Appliance Sales & Service   (Less than 5,000 s.f.)

Food Products Retail, Market or Grocery (Less than 5,00 s.f.)

Funeral Home

Hardware or Paint Retail (Less than 5,000 s.f.)

Horse Production, Commercial

Implement Dealership

Indoor Recreation Facilities (Less than 5,000 s.f.)

Kennel

Laundry, Cleaning or Dyeing

Sporting Goods, Marine, ATV, Snowmobile & Accessories Sales & Service

Theater, Drive-In

Trade/Contractor Establishment or Yard

Solid Waste Transfer Facility (Less than 5,000 s.f.)

Transportation/Motor Freight

 

Permitted Use

Antique Shop, Art Gallery

Barber, Hair Salon or Beauty Shop

Car Wash

Convenience Store, Gas/Grocery/Supplies

Drug Store or Pharmacy

Fast Food or Drive-In Restaurant

Financial or Investment Institution (Less than 2,000 s.f.)

Gas Station with Convenience Store

Greenhouse/Nursery

Group Day Care

Lodging, Hotel, Motel, Resort/Conference Center

Lumber or Building Supplies Retail

Notion, Variety, Card or Gift Shop

Office, Business or Professional

Private Nonprofit Club or Lodge

Restaurant, Dinner Club or Cafe

Self-Storage or Mini-Storage Facility

Theater, Performing Arts or Movie

Veterinary Clinic

Agricultural Land Use District

(Discussed 11-15-2001)

Conditional Use

Horse Production, Private

Livestock Operation/Feedlot  (Over 500 Animal Units)

Permitted Use

General Agriculture

Livestock Grazing

Livestock Operation/Feedlot (Under 500 Animal Units)

Specialty Crop

Specialty Livestock  (Game Farm)

 Agriculture/Residential Land Use District

 Permitted Use

Single Household Residence

Public Hunting & Fishing Facilities

Cemetery

Conditional Use

Park

Playground

Shooting Range

Water Recreation Facilities

Church and Rectory

Community Living Arrangement

Government Building, Storage or Use

Preschool, Elementary School

Alternative School

Home Occupation

Residential Land Use District

 Permitted Use

Single Household Residence

Conditional Use

A Duplex

Multi-Family Dwelling

(Draft 8-15-02)

Plan Implementation

The preparation, discussion of, presentation to the public, and the adoption of a plan is only the beginning of a long process that culminates in the implementation of the plan.  Clearly, the plan may be implemented in segments, including either physical area or physical structure or both.  A schedule for review will be in place to make periodic changes to the Plan to keep up with the changes in growth and development.  Implementation of the plan involves the year-to-year actions of people being focused in a direction or on an objective set forth in the plan.  Those people in the community are sometimes called “planners” and if they are to succeed in even the partial implementation of the adopted plan, they must be diligent and resolute.  A community adopted plan that is not being implemented is not only worthless but reflects on the community’s lack of understanding of, interest in, ability to implement, or leadership regarding the plan.

The primary implementers of a plan are the Plan Commission and the Town Board. The plan itself should be thoroughly reviewed by all members of the Plan Commission and Town Board in order that they can respond to the directives and questions of the appointed and elected officials involved in plan implementation as well as to the general public.

Regulatory devices may include general ordinances such as Town, County, State and Federal zoning ordinances,  as well as ordinances related to a specific topic of concern. The “tools” of plan implementation are the regulatory devices and the detail or specific plans.

Section 66.0295 of Wisconsin Statutes requires that a comprehensive plan or its elements, such as a land use plan, be adopted to be enforceable. Formal adoption by the Plan Commission is required and formal Town Board adoption is suggested, thereby lending credibility to the former action. It is important that such formal adoption be preceded by a public hearing and, perhaps, by an informational meeting(s) at which the proposed plan is thoroughly discussed. All these actions should be duly recorded in minutes of each meeting.

The zoning ordinance is probably the most important document used to implement the land use plan, other than the plan itself.  The zoning ordinance must be comprehensive; that is, detailed enough in every category of use to sufficiently encompass every day-to-day use activity in the community.  Every development proposal and every change of use proposed is governed by two documents – the land use plan and the zoning ordinance.

Rezoning actions by the Planning Commission will be coordinated with the ordinances and policies of the Town Board to ensure compliance with official maps, sign regulations, erosion and storm water control ordinances, historic preservation ordinances, site plan regulations, design review ordinances, building codes, mechanical codes, housing codes, sanitary codes, and subdivision ordinances.  Present non-conforming buildings or structures are allowed as long as there are no changes to the structures. Any requests for additions, alterations, or changes to preexisting non-conforming structures will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the Planning Commission, to determine if an actual hardship exists. Residents will have the right to appeal to the Town Board if their request is not approved.

It is also important that no rezoning be approved without a specific use or development plan being simultaneously approved for the land being zoned. Rezoning for residential subdivision development (“subdivision” as defined by Wisconsin Statute #236.02) requires, simultaneously, a preliminary plan or certified survey map (CSM). Rezoning for a commercial development requires, simultaneously, approval of a detailed development plan. One should not occur without the other. Rezoning for the sake of rezoning only, results in the community becoming a party to land sale speculation with little further control and no guarantee of ultimate development, specifically compatible with the long range land use plan.

Summary

The goals of the town as expressed by their representatives are to preserve the rural character and the natural environment of the town as it develops. This is done through organized growth through zoning districts.

Implementation of the land use plan will take diligence and a strong will on the part of the Plan Commission and Town Board members to meet the goals expressed by the citizens of the town. A comprehensive zoning ordinance is an absolute necessity as a tool in plan implementation. The adherence to the land use plan in the rezoning and development of the town will ensure plan implementation. The first step in such plan implementation is the formal adoption of the Comprehensive Land Use Plan.  Once this is accomplished, subsequent steps can be taken to complete the ordinance.